From War and Peace to White Rabbits — Literary references fly at UNSC meeting

SOT, Journalist: «We're rereading Alice in Wonderland.» SOT, Karen Pierce, UK representative to UN: «Everyone is now going to reread Alice in Wonderland and we've asked for the Russian Ambassador's library list, but in retaliation, or in return, we are of course going to be dusting off our copies of War and Peace, Animal Farm and 1984.» From War and Peace to Alice and Wonderland, viewers did... Еще not have to follow the White Rabbit to catch all the literary references flying between the Russian and United Kingdom's representatives to the United Nations at Thursday's UN Security Council meeting in New York City. Russian Ambassador to UN Vasilli Nebenzya kicked off the war of words: «Everyone who knows Crime novels, for example the Midsummer Murders ... all know hundreds of very clever ways of killing someone,» stated Nebenzya, adding that those who attempted to kill ex-Russian double agent Sergei Skripal chose «the most risky and dangerous method possible. At the same time they didn't really finish the job.» Nebenzya continued by criticising UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson's reference to Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment, saying «it's not a crime novel as the British Minister thinks, but rather a deep philosophical work of literature.» I would suggest that Mr. Johnson perhaps read some other novels by Dostoyevsky, or at least get to know their names,» he added. The Russian Ambassador went on to read an Orwellian scene from Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland about the trial and sentencing of a knave in the Royal Courts before a verdict can even be reached. «'Let the jury consider the verdict' the King said for about the twentieth time that day. 'No, no' said the Queen, 'Sentence first, verdict afterwards',» he quoted. Dropping some more literary references, Nebenzya went on to describe the UK's Skripal accusations against Russia as a «Theatre of the Absurd,» adding that «In conclusion Mr. President, there is really Nothing New Under the Sun.» In response, the UK representative to the UN Karen Pierce fired back with another quote from Alice in Wonderland, «sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast,» adding that «I think that's the quote that suits my Russian colleague best.» Pierce went on to joke with journalists after the meeting, saying that «Everyone is now going to reread Alice in Wonderland and we've asked for the Russian Ambassador's library list, but in retaliation, or in return, we are of course going to be dusting off our copies of War and Peace, Animal Farm and 1984.» SOURCE: UNIFEED-UNTV

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